Citing Sources

Short Tutorial on Citing Sources

If you're using footnotes, you have to adopt a style and keep with it. If you're not footnoting, you need to give resource name, author if appropriate, and page number.

What sources can you quote, you can choose your limitations. In general, you can quote short pieces from magazines and newspapers, make sure to give date of publication in these cases (example: Jan-Mar or June 23, 2014, depending on how often it is published and the name of the author, if given).

What constitutes a sources. Almost anything, except Wikipedia and other sources like it. Wikipedia has sources listed, which you can search to find the original source for the piece you want to add to your publication, but since it is an open source document, which anyone can add to that means misinformation can easily be given. So, in general, it is frowned upon to quote  citing Wikipedia as the source. You can, as I said, find the original source and quote from that. Wikipedia is a great source to read and gain the knowledge you might need on a particular topic. I know that sounds like an oxymoron, but I'm just passing on the fact that Wikipedia is not a respected source. So, if you choose to quote and cite Wikipedia, get ready for the push back from your readers.

If you go to a lecture, you can quote giving credit to the person doing the lecture. I would normally cite this as name, lecture place and date. If you do an interview with someone, you can cite this by just giving the name.

When to use footnotes? I would use footnotes for an academic or industry paper, such as a thesis or white paper. Books that are of a high level and intended as research, I would use footnotes and list resources at the back of the book giving all the details of each quote.

If you copy info and paste a section of text from some source into your document,and then rewrite it, you do not have to give credit provided you used this copy mostly for mental inspiration and to remind you what points you want to make.

Blog Hop Fun

10440841_10202929525093716_8750354770500437189_nFor the last 30 days, I’ve been part of a 30-Day Book Marketing Challenge, which is part of D’vorah Lansky’s offerings at Build a Business with Your Book. D’vorah is the Book Marketing Wizard; and she has a knack of inspiring confidence in her students! I know, I’m one of her students.

The Blog Hop Fun is how D’vorah built-in a way for everyone to celebrate what they learned in the Challenge. For me, I had already taken her Virtual Book Tour and Teleseminar Boot Camp, and the Author Mastery Circle. Now, in the 30-Day Book Marketing Challenge, I have been one of the contributors, which definitely is an honor.

So this blog is supposed to be about what I learned in this 30-Day Challenge. You might think, “Oh, I’ve done a lot of these, what else can I learn?” Well, learning isn’t finite. No matter what classes, workshops, or challenges you take, there is always something to learn. There was a lot of diversity in the offerings throughout the Challenge; and I confess to have learned quite a lot, in spite of attending many programs on Book Marketing.

Kristen Eckstein in her contribution to the Challenge talked about creating an 18-week series of Kindle books. Kristen’s expertise is in e-Book publishing. Her story was very captivating. She created the series, but she had other books already out on Amazon. The series has brought a number of positive results for her, including: a passive income that skyrocketed 878%, which came within the first 12 weeks and has remained consistent.

Wow! Let’s see, if my earnings were $10, then an 878% increase would turn my $10 into $87.90. Maybe at this level it isn’t as impressive as you’d like, but what if the earnings were $100, which make your 878% increase $878. More impressive? I think so! How about if you currently bring in $1,000? Then, the 878% increase makes your $1,000 turn into $8,780.

Perhaps, what really impressed me is that several of her titles continued to hit the Amazon Best Sellers list without actually trying. And she’s getting calls from people all around the world for interviews, including international magazines. She also said back-end sales continue to pour in. So…why is writing Kindle Books my choice to talk about out of a Book Marketing Challenge? Well, really...what’s there to question?

Part of the allure, naturally, is that it involves writing and sharing of expertise. What writer doesn’t like to write? And what teacher doesn’t like to teach? So, I think it’s a good match. Another point is that it will help me sell other books,which is very attractive! Let’s see write books to sell other books? Oh, yes! This is definitely captivating!

As a creative person, I am the first person to say that writing another book is always fun…and most of the time trumps marketing. I’ve, of course, learned and put into practice many marketing techniques. I have fallen in love with marketing through teleseminars. As a journalist, interviewing was always my favorite part. Whether being interviewed or interviewing others, this allows you to keep the creative process and still market yourself and your book or books.

The delicious thing about Kindle e-Books is that they can be taken from a blog post and expanded. That’s a big plus, because you aren’t starting from scratch. Good content, however, is the key to making the e-Books successful. A series of Kindle books means that they need to have some similarities, especially the covers. This captured my attention, because I rarely start a book project without creating a visual...like a book cover. Even when I illustrated with quilts or puppets, I had them in mind when I began the book.

Creating a Kindle series is certainly a creative way to market. The series of e-Books do not need to be mirrors of your other books in order to sell them. The idea is that a series of high quality Kindle books that are promoted well can help sell all of your books. Whether it increases your income by 878% is not a given, but whatever increase it makes…certainly that’s an improvement that anyone can accept!

The Blog Hop Fun is how D’vorah built-in a way for everyone to celebrate what they learned in the Challenge. For me, I had already taken her Virtual Book Tour and Teleseminar Boot Camp, and the Author Mastery Circle. Now, in the 30-Day Book Marketing Challenge, I have been one of the contributors, which definitely is an honor.

So this blog is supposed to be about what I learned in this 30-Day Challenge. You might think, “Oh, I’ve done a lot of these, what else can I learn?” Well, learning isn’t finite. No matter what classes, workshops, or challenges you take, there is always something to learn. There was a lot of diversity in the offerings throughout the Challenge; and I admit that I learned quite a lot.

Kristen Eckstein in her contribution to the Challenge talked about creating an 18-week series of Kindle books. Kristen’s expertise is in e-Book publishing. Her story was very captivating. She created the series, but she had other books already out on Amazon. The series has brought a number of positive results for her, including: a passive income that skyrocketed 878%, which came within the first 12 weeks and has remansistent. Let’s see, if my earnings were $10 , then an 878% increase would turn my $10 into $87.90. Maybe at this level it isn’t as impressive as you’d like, but what if the earnings were $100, which make your 878% increase to $878. More impressive? I think so! How about if you currently bring in $1,000? Then, the 878% increase makes your $1,000 turn into $8,780.

What also impressed me is that several of her titles continued to hit the Amazon Best Sellers list without actually trying. And she’s getting calls from people all around the world for interviews, including international magazines. She said that her back-end sales continue to pour in. So…why is writing Kindle Books my choice to talk about out of the Book Marketing Challenge?

Part of the allure, naturally, is that it involves writing and sharing of expertise. What writer doesn’t like to write? And what teacher doesn’t like to teach? So, I think it’s a good match. Another point is that it will help me sell other books; and that is very attractive! Let me review: write books to sell other books? Yes, that definitely is captivating!

Creating   Magic - meditationWhat is attractive about Kindle e-Books is that they can be taken from a blog post and expanded. That’s a big plus, because you aren’t starting from scratch. Good content, however, is the key to making the e-Books successful. A series of Kindle books means that they need to have some similarities, especially the covers. That captured my attention, because I rarely start a book project without creating a visual like a book cover. Even when I illustrated with quilts or puppets, I had them in mind when I began the book. So, in my commitment to write a series of Kindle e-Books, I created my covers. They are all similar, in that the top of each cover is identical. The background is all the same and the bottom is identical, as well. The middle of the book cover changes to some degree, but even that has some similarities, such as the same typeface and size. Placement of the Subtitle is the same. Each book has art that sits on the right-hand side of the page opposite the subtitle.

Creating a Kindle series is certainly a creative way to market. The series of e-Books do not need to be mirrors of your other books in order to sell them. The idea is that a series of high quality Kindle books that are promoted well can help sell all of your books. Whether it increases your income by 878% is not a given, but whatever increase it makes…certainly that’s an improvement that anyone can accept!